Sustainable Living "Off the Grid" with Madrone Hill Cottage (sponsored by Sol Organics)

I sat down with my mom- Karin Cantlon, of Madrone Hill Cottage this past week. 

At Madrone Hill Cottage, she and my Dad- Joe, live off the grid. When i say “off the grid” I don’t mean they just live in the middle of nowhere (which they do), I mean they live off of the electrical grid and they have no city plumbing or city water. No, this does not mean they are living like campers!

Instead, they power their home with solar, use a compostable toilet, and collect their own rainwater. 

They practice sustainable living in some very big ways. But I asked Karin, what about the small things? What are some ways they practice sustainable living in their everyday choices that the rest of us can reap inspiration from? 

Karin gave me 4 things she does to foster her environmentally conscious lifestyle while living off the grid. 

  1. Karin is mindful to purchase her linens and towels from companies that are sustainable and ethical. She, like myself, uses SOL organics! Sol Organics is fair trade, uses zero plastic in their packaging, and even donates $7.50 per sale to charity! SOL uses 100% organic cotton grown from non-GMO seed. They are committed to supporting better farming practices that reduce carbon footprint, conserve and protect drinking water, and keep us and our communities safe. Being certified fair trade, they have a commitment to no child labor- EVER, and they partner only with facilities that pay a LIVING wage and are committed to the wellbeing of the people who work there. (use code RFF20 for 20% off)


    Not to mention- how beautiful is this bedding bundle in their cottage?! 

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2. From day one, Karin was conscious of her interior design. I learned thrifting and antique shopping from my mom. She’s been popping tags since before it was cool. (haha- Macklemore anyone?!) Instead of buying new, most of her items are up-cycled! She has a whole blog post HERE dedicated to sustainable and affordable ways to design, but here are a few examples:

  • The “kitchen table. Karin and Joe used the top of of my childhood table that we’ve had since I can remember to create their island table. They simply cut off the legs and mounted it to the metal storage base that they wanted.  In her blog post, Karin says, “I was going to purchase hardwood lumber for our island table, which was going to be somewhat pricey. Joe realized that our current tabletop would fit perfectly, we just needed to remove the legs! I was super happy we could incorporate it, since it was the first piece of furniture Joe and I purchased as a married couple and both our kids grew up eating meals, finishing homework, and making crafts at this table.”

  • The green “pantry” door. A great score from an antique store!

  • The bathroom “vanity”. To create this lovely piece, Karin cut a hole in the top of an old dresser that she repaint and put a sink in it! The plumbing process was a more intensive than that… but you get the idea!

  • The kitchen sink. She found this old barn house sink from Craigslist. She looked for 8 months before she found the perfect one. According to Karin, patience is KEY in sustainable design.

The kitchen table.

The kitchen table.

The pantry door.

The pantry door.

An antique dresser from an estate sale.

An antique dresser from an estate sale.

The barn house sink from Craigslist.

The barn house sink from Craigslist.

3. She shops in bulk. 

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4. Karin is conscious of her water usage. When you live in Central Texas that is prone to droughts and you are responsible for collecting all your own water from the rain, you become highly aware of your water usage. This is true even in times of plenty. At this point, Joe and Karin have built up enough water supply that they really don’t NEED to “watch” their water usage, but water becomes more precious when you know where it came from and have a realization that it is a finite and valuable resource. This is a lesson we can all apply!! 

Use code RFF20 for 20% off @ Sol Organics.

Sustainably Supported by SOL Organics. As always, all opinions are mine & these are products I truly love!  #sponsored


A Few of My DIY Bathroom Staples + Tips to Support a Healthy Urinary Tract

Hi everyone!

I’m so excited and honored to partner with MegaFood® to discuss women’s health along with a few tips you can do to maintain urinary tract health* and keep your downstairs area feeling clean & pristine!

I was introduced to MegaFood fairly recently, but once I started looking into their company, I realized how profoundly our missioned aligned. Megafood supports regenerative agriculture and they are dedicated and committed to getting glyphosate (Round-up) removed from our food systems. They partner with like-minded farmers who are committed to organic and regenerative agriculture to bring us the most high-quality supplements derived with real food. In fact, they are the first supplement company to have their entire brand certified Glyphosate Residue Free! They are also a certified B Corporation and therefore, have the highest standards of social and environmental performance, product and supply chain transparency, and legal accountability. Honestly, I couldn’t be more obsessed with the mission behind this company.

But I digress. MegaFood Women's Health Shelf-Stable Probiotic has become one of my most favorite (and crucial) bathroom hygiene essentials! I, like most women, am determined to support a healthy urinary tract.* Right next to my hair salt spray (for beach like waves) and homemade salve (the ultimate moisturizer), this probiotic keeps me feeling fierce & motivated to take on the world.

But before we get to the recipes for the salt spray and salve, here are my tips for supporting urinary tract health! These are tips that I’ve found personally helpful and also derived from my clinical experience working in women’s health at Nourishing Minds Nutrition.

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Tips to Support a Healthy Urinary Tract:

  1. Tend to your vaginal microbiome by taking a quality women’s health probiotic. A good women’s health probiotic will have strains indigenous to the vagina - such as lactobacillus gasseri and lactobacillus crispatus. These lactic acid producing bacteria acidify the environment to make a natural barrier to pathogens! The vagina is actually very acidic - maintaining a ph between 3.5 & 4.5.

We often hear “microbiome” in reference to the gut microbiome. But the truth is, there are numerous microbiomes throughout the body- the vagina being just one of them. This microbiome is made up of lactic acid producing bacteria (lactobacillus) and organisms we call strict anaerobes. The balance between anaerobes and lactobacillus microbes is very important. I recommend MegaFood Women's Health Shelf-Stable Probiotic for a healthy urinary tract and the added bonus of supporting gut health.* It contains 50 Billion CFU of live bacteria to promote good gut health.* Did I mention it’s shelf-stable? That means you can toss these in your purse or gym bag and you’re good to go!

2. Tend to your gut health! Gut health, vaginal & urethra health all go hand in hand. Without getting too technical (just get to the point, Meg!), the gut microbiome is in a sense, the “command center” for all other mucosal tissues. This means that if there is a compromised ecology in the gut, this will translate into the other microbes- such as the urinary tract & vagina. Of course, a good probiotic and/or fermented foods is imperative to gut health. Another practical way of improving your gut health is diversifying your diet! Most people in our modern culture only eat around 15 foods. Their ancestors would have consumed between 600 and 800 varieties throughout the year! Have fun and play with different fruits, veggies, herbs, spices etc!

3. Don’t Douche! Your vaginal microbiome is everything! And douching disrupts that. Lactobacillus bacteria are very fragile, and they don’t cling on to cells easily. This means that when you douche, you are disrupting that protective ecosystem. Don’t do it!

4. Add cranberry to your diet. Cranberries are age-old wisdom for helping ladies maintain a healthy urinary tract. Fortunately, the MegaFood Women's Health* Shelf-Stable Probiotic already has cranberry in it with a mighty dose of CRAN d’OrTM.*

5. Don’t hold your pee & pee after sex. Simple, but important.

6. Change clothes after the gym. If you workout, don’t sit in your sweaty clothes all day if you can help it! Switch out of those leggings and let your body breathe.


You can take every precaution in your lifestyle choices, but if you are not addressing your gut health (which then translates to your vaginal and urethral health) you will miss the most crucial part of building an optimal foundation to good health.*


Alas, my recipes for the salve & sea salt spray:

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Sea Salt Spray- to spritz on your hair in the morning for a beachy waves!


Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup warm h2O

  • 1 tbsp salt

  • 1/4 tsp of your home condition

  • 2 drops essential oil of choice (I use eucalyptus currently)

Method:
Simply combine all ingredients into a small spray bottle. Shake until the salt dissolves. Will last 3-4 months or longer.

Rose Petal Infused Salve

Ingredients:

  • ~ 3/4 cup dried roses

  • ~ 1 cup sweet almond oil

  • 1 ounce beeswax

  • double boiler

  • 2 clean, empty 16 oz mason jars

  • Kitchen scale

Part 1: Infuse your oil

  • Fill one of the mason jars about 3/4th way with dried rose petals. Don’t worry about being exact! This ain’t candy making people!

  • Fill the jar with sweet almond oil- ensuring the petals are covered completely by at least 1 inch.

  • Cap the jar and shake well!  Shake the herbs at least once a day.  After 2-4 weeks, strain through a mesh strainer. Whala- you have your infused oil! This infused oil is lovely for healing ointment on scars, eczema & psoriasis, wrinkles, sun damage, and just general maintenance on dry areas. I even use it around my eyes before I go to sleep.

Part 2: Make the salve!

  1. Prepare your double boiler with simmering water. (You can make a make shift one at home if you don’t have one! That’s what I do.)

  2. Pour 7 oz strained & infused rose petal oil into the double boiler. Add 1 ounce beeswax and stir until the beeswax has completely dissolved.

  3. Carefully pour hot salve into clean jar and cool completely before use.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.


Creating Closed Loop Systems with Plaine Products

When I found Plaine Products, I was literally giddy with excitement. GIDDY!

Why?

Plaine Products has made personal hygiene products waste free. WASTE FREE PEOPLE! And not the kind of waste free where you have to compromise quality. And not the kind that you have to make all your own from apple cider and be a full on crunchy hippie. (Even though that’s cool too! haha!)

This is the kind that provides a high quality, “clean” product that is also vegan and cruelty free. See why I was giddy? This product is almost too good to be true. But it’s not!

Sisters Lindsey and Alison Delaplaine- founders of Plaine Products, have made reducing our plastic consumption and creating a close loop system in our bathroom as easy as putting something in the mail. Their bottles of shampoo, conditioner, body lotion, body wash, and hand soap are REFILLABLE. You simply send your bottles back in and get them refilled with your favorite products to keep you squeaky clean and moisturized!

I know I sound like a broken record at this point- talking about the “plastic problem”, but stats and facts are eye opening, motivating, and therefore empowering. So a few plastic stats:

  • The shampoo bottles thrown out every year in the U.S. could fill 1,164 football fields.

  • Globally, we produce 300 million tons of plastic waste every year, 78 percent of which is NOT reclaimed or recycled.

  • Global, 32% of the annual plastic production ends up in the oceans. This equates to pouring one garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute. This number is projected to increase.

Scary huh? Does this create a sense of urgency inside of you? Me too.

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How Plaine Products is Changing the Game

After witnessing first hand the damaging effects of plastic in our oceans, Lindsey and Alison Delaplaine decided to do something about it and set out on a mission. They wanted to lead the way for a new kind of consumerism. To create circular economies and closed loop systems in households instead of linear ones that lead to landfill or our oceans.

As time goes on, our world is in increasing need for circular systems to be implemented- on both a global scale, as well as on in smaller scale- such as in our own homes. What is a circular economy you ask?

A circular economy or system is one that connects the ends- so there is no end. There is no trashcan or landfill. Resources are simply repurposed and returned back to the “circle of life”. Some simple examples include: 

  • Repurposing a dish sponge to a bath cleaning sponge and then composting it instead of throwing it away. 

  • Buying clothing second hand or giving your unwanted clothes to a friend instead of throwing them away. 

  • Composting your food scraps and organic waste instead of throwing them away.

In this model, companies evaluate their supply chain and implement reduction, reuse, and various recycling techniques to minimize the waste their product generates. Here are some examples:

  • Timberland is partnering with Omni to make shoes out of tires. 

  •  HP is recovering plastic from used ink cartridges and toners via the Planet Partners program and recycles it to produce new ink cartridges

  •  Southwest Airlines partners with Loopworks to repurpose its used seat leather into LUV seat weekender duffle bags, shoes, and soccer balls.

HOW COOL IS ALL OF THIS?!

This type of innovative thinking not only saves and repurposes natural resources, it reduces CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions. There are countless more examples of companies making big strides to more sustainable production values, but still, we need more to be on board.

In supporting Plaine and companies like Plaine, you are voting with your dollar. You contributing to the tipping point that is needed for our economy to continue to shift to more circular thinking. You can also feel good that staying clean and our personal hygiene does not come at a cost to our environment. 

But what about their ingredients, you ask? What about the actual products.

Check it out: 

  • Free of sulfates, parabens, phthalates and palm oil

  • Blended with whole essential oils (instead of synthetic fragrance)

  • Vegan and have non GMO ingredients

  • Designed to biodegrade

  • Baby safe and hypoallergenic 

  • Cruelty Free, Leaping Bunny certified 

They derive their high quality ingredients from Mother Nature. They utilize things like aloe vera extract and mango butter, vitamin E, green tea, and essential oils in their products. 

And I’ll vouch first hand- not only are they  “clean”, they actually get you CLEAN. I have think hair that does not come clean very early to be honest. Ive tried a handful of “clean” shampoos, including shampoo bars and none have been nearly as effective as Plain Products. I give Plaine a 10/10. And so does my husband! He’s even harder to please than I am. haha! 

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Sustainably Supported by Plaine Products. As always, all opinions are mine & these are products I truly love!  #sponsored


How to Make Your Own Wool Dryer Balls- and why you need them!

Do you have a less than amazingly efficient dryer system?

Me me!! Sadly, I fall into this camp. My husband and i have a stacking system as this is all our tiny space will fit. Well, do yourself and the environment a favor by making some dryer balls! Believe it or not, they actually REDUCE dry time! Plus you can spray them with essential oils and infuse your clothes with a lovely sent!

Benefits:

  • They decrease drying time! As they bounce around, the separate your clothes and allow air to circulate.

  • They’re chemical free alternatives to putting tennis balls in your dryer! (Yes, people actually do that haha)

  • They increase fluffiness & reduce static in your clothes

  • They can infuse your clothes with smell good essential oils- a GREAT alternative to single use, chemical infused dryer sheets!

You can make dryer balls with nothing but wool yarn. However, to make my wool yarn go farther and to get more bang for my buck, my directions involve cutting up an old, thrift store wool sweater. This allowed me to spend $12 on 3 large dryer balls vs $30 on 3 small.

Supplies:

  • skien of 100% wool yarn (choose one not labeled “super wash” or “machine washable”

  • a 100% wool sweater from a thrift store. (Preferably an ugly one so you don’t feel bad cutting it up! haha!)

  • panty hose

  • scissors

  • pieces of yarn or twine

Method:

  1. Cut your wool sweater into long, thin rectangles. Mine are about 3x8.

  2. Create a ball with the wool strips.

  3. Bind the wool ball with the wool yarn. Twist it around tightly to completely cover the ball several times. Tie it off on itself.

  4. To felt the ball, put it in a pantyhose leg. Tie it off the ends with the piece of yarn.

  5. Wash the balls(s) with a load of laundry on HOT. Then dry them on the highest setting you have. Do this twice- or until the ball is completely felted.

  6. Now, they’re ready to roll!! (literally) Add a few drops of essential oils on them before drying your clothes to add  fragrance to your clothes.

    These babies will last your for years! 100+ loads!

Photo Instructions:

Gather your supplies:    * skien of 100% wool yarn (choose one not labeled “super wash” or “machine washable”  * a 100% wool sweater from a thrift store. (Preferably an ugly one so you don’t feel bad cutting it up! haha!)  * panty hose  * scissors  * pieces of yarn or twine

Gather your supplies:

* skien of 100% wool yarn (choose one not labeled “super wash” or “machine washable”

* a 100% wool sweater from a thrift store. (Preferably an ugly one so you don’t feel bad cutting it up! haha!)

* panty hose

* scissors

* pieces of yarn or twine

Cut your wool sweater into long, thin rectangles. Mine are about 3x8.

Cut your wool sweater into long, thin rectangles. Mine are about 3x8.

Create a ball with the wool strips.

Create a ball with the wool strips.

3. Bind the wool ball with the wool yarn.

3. Bind the wool ball with the wool yarn.

Twist it around tightly to completely cover the ball several times. Tie it off on itself.

Twist it around tightly to completely cover the ball several times. Tie it off on itself.

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To felt the ball, put it in a pantyhose leg. Tie it off the ends with the piece of yarn. Wash the balls(s) with a load of laundry on HOT. Then dry them on the highest setting you have. Do this twice- or until the ball is completely felted.

To felt the ball, put it in a pantyhose leg. Tie it off the ends with the piece of yarn. Wash the balls(s) with a load of laundry on HOT. Then dry them on the highest setting you have. Do this twice- or until the ball is completely felted.

Mine could use a few more rounds in the washer to get felted better, but you get the idea!   Now, they’re ready to roll!! (literally) Add a few drops of essential oils on them before drying your clothes to add  fragrance to your clothes.

Mine could use a few more rounds in the washer to get felted better, but you get the idea!

Now, they’re ready to roll!! (literally) Add a few drops of essential oils on them before drying your clothes to add  fragrance to your clothes.

6 Enticing Environmental & Global Health Reasons to Switch to the Menstrual Cup

I am so proud to partner with OrganiCup to discuss these important topics!

Most women I talk with are a little weirded out by the idea of a “menstrual cup” at first. They think it sounds weird or painful or ineffective or just “gross”.

Well, I’m here to tell you - it is none of those things! In fact, menstrual cups are the SHIT.

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The irony is, the convention methods (think tampons & pads) of managing our periods can be all of those things! But in many ways, because they are what is “normal” and “accepted”, we don’t think much of it. So I challenge you to challenge the paradigms around your period! I was stubborn for far too long and now I’m kicking myself for the years I wasted not using the cup. The cup has changed my period experience forever!

Apart from the hygienic and mere convenience benefits of the cup (think 12 hours of coverage!) there are tremendous health and environmental benefits to switching over!

But first, let’s cover a few period stats and facts:

  • It is estimated that over 45 billion products related to periods (tampons, pads, applicators) are thrown away each year.

  • The average woman uses between 11,000 and 16,000 feminine products in her lifetime.

  • Pad and tampon brands are not required by law to list the materials and ingredients used in the production of their products. (eeekk!)

All to say, periods are a big deal! How we manage them can have significant health & environmental implications. Becoming aware of the bigger picture surrounding our periods and the management of them can allow us all to make the most informed decisions. I think you may be surprised to realize, your period management choices not only affect you- but the planet and people around the globe as well.

So let’s get to it! 6 reasons to consider switching to the cup:

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  1. Cotton is one of the most pesticide- intensive crops grown on the planet- and your vagina is hella absorbent!! In fact, because the vagina is so rapidly absorbent, researchers have explored the possibility of delivering drugs vaginally! If you’re buying non organic tampons, you’re most likely purchasing something that contains non-organic cotton and therefore sprayed heavily with pesticides & other chemicals. These companies often use bleach and whitening agents as well as chemical fragrance & dyes. Side note: glyphosate is the herbicide found in Round-up weed killer. In once study, 85% of tampons tested contained glyphosate. Yeah, it’s not a pretty picture. Women have the right to know what is in their products so that they can make informed decisions for their own health. I’d bet that most of us don’t want to absorb chemicals up our vagina for a week out of every month.

  2. Hazardous pesticides associated with global cotton production represent a substantial threat to global freshwater resources. Although it is only grown on 2.5% of the world’s agricultural land, cotton consumes 16% of all the insecticides and 6.8% of all herbicides used worldwide. In fact, it is responsible for the release of US$ 2 billion of chemical pesticides each year, within which at least US$ 819 million are considered toxic enough to be classified as hazardous by the World Health Organization. (WOWZA!) Not only do these chemicals have personal health implications (as seen in #1), they also have incredible environmental implications. When these pesticides are washed out of the soil, they pollute rivers and groundwater- especially those in neighboring communities! Cotton pesticides have been found to contaminate rivers in the USA, India, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Brazil, Australia, Greece and West Africa. Furthermore, monocultures grown in this way strips the soil of its biodiversity and inherent ecosystem. This continues to contribute to the degradation of our farmland and to climate change.

  3. Cotton is a very water intensive crop. Organic or not, cotton requires a large amount of water in its production and processing. In fact, it is considered to be the world’s “thirstiest crop”. When soil quality is poor (more likely in the case of non-organic crops), this causes the crops to require more water due to reduced water infiltration rates. This leads to a vicious cycle of soil degradation and increased water usage. To give some perspective, according to WWF (World Wildlife Fund), it takes more than 5,283 gallons of water to produce just 2.2 pounds of cotton, which roughly equals one T-shirt and a pair of jeans.

  4. The people (and children) involved in the cotton supply chain. It’s easy for those of us living in developed countries to buy our cotton tampons (or clothing for that matter) and not think much of who was involved in the supply chain of these products. But when we stop to consider these things, the truth isn’t pretty.

    According to the Environmental Justice Foundation, 99% of the world’s cotton farmers live and work in the developing world where low levels of safety awareness, lack of protective equipment, illiteracy, poor labelling of pesticides, and chronic poverty exacerbate the damage caused by cotton pesticides to low income communities.

    Children are often involved directly with pesticide application even though they are particularly vulnerable and often the first victims to pesticide poisoning.

    According to organicconsumers.org, in Egypt, more than 50% of the cotton workers in the 1990s suffered symptoms of chronic pesticide poisoning. That’s just one example of the realities of conventional global cotton production. Cheap cotton comes at a price, and someone is paying it.

  5. Tampon applicators and pads are forever. This shit doesn’t degrade. And if it does, it will take centuries. The Ocean Conservancy collected nearly 30,000 used tampons and applicators on beaches in just a single day in 2015.  When tampons are flushed, they can end up in sewer systems and waterways. When they are thrown away, they go to landfill. Pads are majority made of plastic and therefore, are also not biodegradable.

  6. CUPS ARE CHEAPER! Let’s be honest, we’ve all complained of buying tampons! They are by design, single use and they are certainly not cheap! Invest in a cup- typically around $30, and you’ll save a mad amount of money over your lifetime. This point is not necessarily environmentally based, but it is if you consider that you are not giving your money to support the corrupt global cotton industry!

There are many more benefits of switching to a cup, but I think you get the picture.

It’s cool and empowering to know that by merely switching to the cup, you can have a global impact.

Menstrual cups take a bit to get use to, but once you go to one, you will never go back!

Grab yours HERE. You'll want a size A if you’ve never had children and a size B if you have. Use code ROOT for 20% off.

Sustainably Supported by OrganiCup. As always, all opinions are mine & these are products I truly love!  #sponsored


Fermented Radishes with Garlic & Dill

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Pros of living in Florida — produce year around!

Pros of living in Florida — produce year around!

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of filtered water

  • 1 tbsp of pink salt

  • 2 bunches of radishes

  • 1 handful of dill

  • 5 garlic cloves (you can use less.. I just really like garlic!)

  • Pint size large mouth mason jar

  • Smaller jar to use as a weight

  • Cheese cloth (or any cloth, really) & rubber band

Method:

  1. Make the brine by boiling 2 cups of filtered water with 1 tbsp of salt.

  2. Wash your radishes well with warm water. Remove tops and tails. Slice into thin quarters or halves.

  3. Add dill and garlic to the bottom of the jar. Add radishes. Pour in the brine - enough to submerge the veggies by a few inches.

  4. Weight down the contents with the smaller jar to prevent the veggies from rising above the surface. (They must remain submerged under the water!)

  5. Cover the jar with cloth and rubber band.

  6. Allow time to ferment- at least 3 days. Store in a dark, room temp location until desired flavor / texture is achieved.

  7. Store in the fridge. I personally love serving them with hummus and crackers! SO delicious!

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Sustainable Home Decorating with SOL Organics

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This past weekend I redid my bedroom. To be honest, Blake and I have been married for almost 5 years, and for the first 2 years with him in med school, we never really had enough money for me to spend even a cent on something that seemed so frivolous as bedroom decor.

Maybe some of you can relate?

But even after med-school, in our quest to be frugal and allocate resources appropriately, it never seemed like a worthwhile cause.

Well, I’ll have to say, getting this stunning, fair trade organic cotton bedding set by Sol Organics changed everything this past weekend. It was like getting a new pair of jeans and all of the sudden wanting to get a new haircut or upgrade your makeup too.

You may say- bold move ordering all white bedding with 4 animals. And I’d say… touche. But I’m a SUCKER for clean, light and bright spaces. I love how crisp and clean it looks. (as long as I keep my dog off of it!)

You may say- bold move ordering all white bedding with 4 animals. And I’d say… touche. But I’m a SUCKER for clean, light and bright spaces. I love how crisp and clean it looks. (as long as I keep my dog off of it!)

I’m thrilled about Sol Organics because their mission is so aligning with my own. They are sustainable, organic, fair trade, and transparent. Honestly, even their “about” page on their website gives me chills and makes me proud to use this bedding. They have a commitment to no child labor- EVER, and they partner only with facilities that pay a LIVING wage and are committed to the wellbeing of the people who work there. I will be sleeping well at night knowing the sheets I’m using were made fairly and justly.

I can’t help but think about the people making those products. Who are they? What are their working conditions? Are children involved? How can I be sure? How can my customers be sure? –Vishal Naithani, Co-Founder

SOL uses 100% organic cotton grown from non-GMO seed. They are committed to supporting better farming practices that reduce carbon footprint, converse and protect drinking water, and keep us and our communities safe.

SOL uses 100% organic cotton grown from non-GMO seed. They are committed to supporting better farming practices that reduce carbon footprint, converse and protect drinking water, and keep us and our communities safe.

SOL uses 100% organic cotton grown from non-GMO seed. They are committed to supporting better farming practices that reduce carbon footprint, converse and protect drinking water, and keep us and our communities safe.

Sol Organics bedding bundle. Includes:  • 1 Fitted Sheet  • 1 Flat Sheet  • 2 Pillowcases* • Duvet Cover • 2 Pillow Sham Covers* • 100% GOTS Certified

Sol Organics bedding bundle. Includes:

• 1 Fitted Sheet
• 1 Flat Sheet
• 2 Pillowcases*
• Duvet Cover
• 2 Pillow Sham Covers*
• 100% GOTS Certified

And one of the best things about them is that in all of this, they have made their products affordable.

Affordability is the tipping point. It promotes access, which in turn creates demand and conversion to organic cotton. It creates a symbiosis in which everyone wins: the farmer, the consumer and the earth. – Sachin Chauhan, Co-Founder

So back to my bedroom… receiving my SOL bedding in the mail sparked something inside of me- why do I care about styling the rest of the home to be a representation of Blake and I, but our bedroom- this sacred space where there is precious sleep, pillow talk, cuddles… has been put on the back burner?

The cool thing is- 90% of the decor you see in these photos are things I already had. Most of it found at antique or thrift stores. But a new bed set (white instead of dark grey), a few throw pillow and some shelves made the BIGGEST difference. (I wish so badly that I had taken a before picture of our bedroom!!! You honestly would not have recognized it now.)  

Shelves: Made Scratch (thanks Home Depot)  Pillows: Made from fabric I found on sale @ Whimsodoodle in St Pete, FL  Shades: Blackout shades I’ve had for years. I sewed the blue ribbons on top to make them hang prettier  Bedding: SOL organics  Lamp: Thrift store  Signage: Our wedding  Ladder, wool blanket, mountain scape photo: antique stores

Shelves: Made Scratch (thanks Home Depot)

Pillows: Made from fabric I found on sale @ Whimsodoodle in St Pete, FL

Shades: Blackout shades I’ve had for years. I sewed the blue ribbons on top to make them hang prettier

Bedding: SOL organics

Lamp: Thrift store

Signage: Our wedding

Ladder, wool blanket, mountain scape photo: antique stores

I would describe my style as midwestern mid-mod. And I am a full believer that with a little time and patience, you can decorate your home sustainably. I’m now going to walk you through some of my tips for sustainable home decorating and how I applied them to this latest project.

The biggest thing to remember when decorating sustainably- patience is key! It’s so tempting to run to target over the weekend and grab everything you need to make a well decorated room, but sustainable decorating is a much slower process as you acquire quality, unique and sustainably created pieces.


Tips for sustainable decorating:

1. Less is more. Question everything that comes into your home. Instead of trying to fill every nook and cranny with something, embrace blank space. Only buy what you LOVE and brings you joy.

2. Go with classic vs trendy styles. This is true in your wardrobe, but also in your home decorating! Will the items you buy be out of style in a year and will you want to “upgrade”? Consider this when you are finding and honing in on your style!

3. Quality > Quantity. This is applies to everything- furniture, throw blankets, pictures etc. When you purchase something- ask, will this last for years to come? This is why I love to find furniture and the bigger items at thrift and antique stores. I can get amazing quality for a fraction of the price.  In the case of throw blankets- consider investing in a quality, organic cotton throw blanket instead of 10 synthetic ones.

4. Shop local & support local artisans. For example- instead of buying a macrame from target, look for a local artisan! If you don’t have many  local artisans, check Etsy! It’s so rewarding to support small companies and creatives who are trying to make a living with their craft.

5. Hit up thrift stores and garage sales: I have found the BEST things at thrift stores. Just remember- consistency is key. You probably won’t find THE piece if you go to the Salvation Army 1 time.

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6. Decorate with (real) plants instead of “things”. Plants are so hot right now! haha! Huge bonus- you have a natural air filter!

7. Utilize what you already have. For example, the curtains are nothing special- they are blackout shades Blake and I have had for 5 years. To spruce them up, I added the light blue ribbon on them to act as hooks. It made the way they drape much cutter! In my opinion.

8. Of course, the final tip I have for sustainable decorating is to invest in high quality, sustainably sourced bedding, such as SOL organics.

*** Use code RFF20 for 20% off***

I hope this has been helpful and encouraging in your sustainability journey,

Xoxo,


Meg

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Sustainably Supported by SOL Organics. As always, all opinions are mine & these are products I truly love!  #sponsored

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Calendula & Lavender Infused Salve

It’s winter in the states right now! And that means for many of us… DRY, CRACKED SKIN. Well, I have the antidote. And that is this recipe right here! 

I adore this herbal combination! It is healing, soothing, anti-inflammatory, and smells like floral heaven! Calendula is a super flower. It is most often used to treat scrapes, burns, minor cuts, rashes and bug bites. Lavender oil is great to combat acne, soothe dry skin, and reduce redness.

This salve is SO simple to make. The only bummer is that you have to wait 2-3 weeks in order for the oils to infused. But patience little butterfly! It is so worth it.

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Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup dried lavender 

  • 1/2 cup dried calendula flowers

  • 3, clean, empty 8 oz mason jars

  • 2 cups sweet almond oil

  • 1 ounce beeswax

  • double boiler

Part 1: Infuse your oils

  1. Fill one of the mason jars half way with dried lavender. Fill another 1/2 way with dried calendula flowers/petals. 

  2. Fill the jars with sweet almond oil- ensuring the herbs/flowers are covered completely by at least 1 inch. 

  3. Cap the jar and shake well!  Shake the herbs at least once a day.  At this time, also inspect them and ensure no herbs are traveling above the surface. If they do emerge, they will grow mold and your oil will ruin! After 2-3 weeks, strain through a mesh strainer.

Part 2: Make the salve!

  1. Prepare your double boiler with simmering water. (You can even make a make shift one at home if you don’t have one!) 

  2. Pour 1/2 cup Infused lavender oil and 1/2 cup infused calendula oil in the double boiler. Add 1 ounce beeswax and stir until the beeswax has complete dissolved. 

  3. Carefully pour hot salve into clean jar and cool completely before use. 

Fresh calendula flowers

Fresh calendula flowers

I infused this oil with fresh flowers- but I HIGHLY recommend using dry instead. Fresh goes rancid easily.

I infused this oil with fresh flowers- but I HIGHLY recommend using dry instead. Fresh goes rancid easily.

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Lavender & Citrus Infused Cleaning Vinegar

I’ll let you all in on a little secret… you don’t need a different type of cleaner for every crevice of you home!

The truth is, vinegar does quite well as a multipurpose cleaner! Especially when you spruce it up with things like essential oils and herbs. ;)

You may say- well what about the germs?! Will this kill the germs?! The truth is that our modern society has waged war on “bugs” when in fact, we can’t live without them. Just as we are waging war on our beneficial gut microbiome (the colony of bugs that live in your intestines) with antibiotics, we are waging war on the bacteria around us using harsh cleaning agents. In doing this, we are creating “superbugs”- bugs that adapt and survive and can’t be killed with antibiotics. This has been recognized by the CDC as a huge public crisis and they are now making steps to remove antibiotics from hand soaps and other cleaning agents. Each year in the U.S., at least 2 million people get an antibiotic-resistant infection, and at least 23,000 people die. The truth is- we can’t defeat bacteria- we have to foster a symbiotic relationship! Okay, rant over. All to say, vinegar and essential oils clean and disinfect without disrupting the environmental microbiome and creating superbugs.  YAY MOTHER NATURE!!!

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My neighbor has an orange tree that’s making oranges like its her job. I’ve been collecting the peels from the one’s we’ve eaten and used some fresh lavender from my garden to make this lovely scene.

Ingredients:

  • half gallon mason jar (64 oz)

  • glass spray bottle

  • orange, lemon, and/or lime peels- as many as you want/have! The more you use, the stronger the infused smell will be! 

  • 3 bunches of lavender and/or rosemary leaves 

Method:

  1. Collect your citrus peels over a week. (Store in the fridge.)

  2. When you have collect an ample amount of peels, transfer them to your 64 oz mason jar and fill it up  3/4 high with vinegar. Add herbs.

  3. Cover with a cloth and rubber band. Let the peels infuse the vinegar for 3-4 weeks.

  4. Strain vinegar and compost the peels.

  5. To use, pour into a spray bottle until 1/2 full. Fill the rest with water. Use as you would any multipurpose cleaner. (Just avoid using it on stone countertops or wood as it can gradually wear down the sealant!)

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8 Easy Ways to Reduce Plastic in 2019

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1. Ditch single use grocery bags.

This is huge. Check out these stats from biologicaldiversity.org:

  • Americans use 100 billion plastic bags a year, which require 12 million barrels of oil to manufacture.

  • It only takes about 14 plastic bags for the equivalent of the gas required to drive one mile.

  • The average American family takes home almost 1,500 plastic shopping bags a year.

  • Plastic bags take 1000+ years to break down.

The best solution to single use bags is not to buy reusable plastic bags. While that is certainly better, these bags are still plastic and not biodegradable. They will eventually end up in landfills. So the best alternatives are those made of cotton or hemp or other compostable material.

When my cotton bags get dirty, I simply throw them in the wash.

Alternatives to plastic bags:

2. Ditch plastic baggies.

Yes, they are so so convenient for snacks. But a great and reusable alternative are reusable silicone bags, and beeswax wraps.

Alternatives to plastic baggies:

3. Shop in bulk

Think about it- essentially everything you buy is packaged. That is a LOT of packaging. You can easily reduce this dramatically by shopping in bulk. Bonus points- you save money and have a very spiffy and tidy looking pantry!

For shopping in bulk, take your own mason jars and/or small cotton bags for things like nuts and legumes. Ask the merchant to weigh the jars and write the tar weight on the lid so you are not paying for the weight of the jar. Most stores will have no issue doing this.

If they do, just use the bags/containers they provide and reuse them for next time.

Google search for a bulk store in your area! Of course, many grocery stores have a bulk section, but you’ll really hit the jackpot if you can find a store dedicated to BULK!

Some of my favorite bulk items are:

  • Oats

  • Pasta

  • Baking ingredients such as cocoa powder, flour & sugar.

  • Nuts

  • Dried fruit

  • Grains & legumes

  • Tea

  • Spices

  • Balsamic vinegar

  • Apple cider vinegar

Items for bulk shopping:

  • Eco bag produce bags

  • Mason jars

4. Make your own multi-purpose cleaner.

The truth is, you don’t need a different cleaning product for every crevice of your home! You can simply make your own multi-purpose cleaner to reduce money and waste.

(note: not for use on granite or marble countertops - the vinegar can damage the natural stone.. But it’s great for everything else!)

Cleaner Recipe

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar (I use this because I can get it in bulk- but you can use white vinegar as well. Both of these vinegars you can get in glass jars.)

  • 2 cups water

  • 25 drops essential oil of choice  (I recommend you choose a citrus or green oil, such as, lemon, orange, tea tree, or eucalyptus. They are super fresh and antibacterial as well.)  

Method:

Mix ingredients together and pour into a glass spray bottle. Use as needed. (You can grab some glass spray bottles here! Use code ROOTFORFOOD)

5. Switch to a safety razor.

Plastic disposable razors have a very short lifespan. Per the EPA, we throw away billions of razors every year. Where to these end up? Landfills and oceans never to decompose.

On the contrary, safety razors are meant to last a lifetime! Only the razor blades need to be recycled and unlike multi blade razors, standard double-edge safety razor blades are fully-recyclable.

Grab yours here! ( promo code ROOTFORFOOD)

6. Switch to a compostable toothbrush.

3.5 billion toothbrushes are sold every year. We can assume that the majority of these are not compostable or recycled. Need I say more?

Grab your own compostable toothbrush here. ( promo code ROOTFORFOOD)

7. Switch to a menstrual cup.

Ladies, how environmentally friendly are your periods?

It is estimated that over 45 billion products related to periods are thrown away every year. This includes tampons, pads and applicators. Sadly, the Ocean Conservancy collected nearly 30,000 used tampons and applicators on beaches in just a single day in 2015.  When tampons are flushed, they can end up in sewer systems and waterways. When they are thrown away, they go to landfill. Plastic applicators take centuries to biodegrade- cardboard is a better alternative.

Pads are majority made of plastic and therefore, are not biodegradable.

As an alternative, menstrual cups take a bit to get use to, but once you go to one, you will never go back! Seriously- this thing has changed my period experience. Grab yours here. You'll want a size A if you’ve never had children and a size B if you have.

8. Switch to Plastic Free Skincare!

My absolute favorite skin care line is Primally Pure. Not only do they use glass jars, they take their sourcing very seriously with ethical and sustainable standards! You can listen to their esthetician talk about their company, their product, and holistic skin care here.

Not to mention, this stuff has changed my face.

My favorite items are:

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Why Recycling Your Christmas Tree is Important - and how to do it!

Someone asked me yesterday why it mattered if Christmas trees end up in landfills. What difference does it make? What harm does that cause and what is the alternative? 

I thought this was a great and valid question! Especially since there are approximately 25-30 million Christmas trees cut down (and therefore requiring disposal) in the US alone! 

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The downfall of trees and really any organic matter going to landfill is this: 

Organic matter (i.e. lawn clippings, leaves, food scraps, wood etc) does not compost in landfills. This is due to the lack of oxygen present during the breakdown process. Methane gas develops and is released due to the anaerobic (absence of oxygen) decomposition that takes place in a landfill. Alternatively, a compost (and Mother Nature) decomposes organic matter with oxygen. This does not produce methane emission. This is important because methane is 26 times more potent than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. (It holds 26xs more heat in the atmosphere and therefore; is a key player in global warming.)

Organic matter thrown in landfills instead of sent back to the earth is a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions. 

In fact, the estimate that 16% of all methane emissions are from organics that can't decompose and compost properly in landfills.

So this is important shit and applies not only to the proper disposal of Christmas trees, but of all organic matter! But that’s for another day. :)

The upside of consciously disposing of our Christmas tree is this: 

In repurposing/recycling our trees, we are returning them to the earth and respecting the natural process of nature. This has tremendous environmental benefits. As always, mother nature knows best and does best. When trees are recycled, they are often repurposed as mulch or compost. When we do this, we are contributing to a circular economy and finding purpose and value in our “waste”. In doing this, we also minimize the environmental implications of this holiday tradition by reducing greenhouse emissions, and providing benefit to our communities, soil, and environment.

When trees are turned into mulch, they can be distributed on public land or given to those who need it (such as gardeners for weed control!). Mulch can serve as a natural wildlife erosion control and as a organic nutrient supply. When Christmas trees are added to compost, they add valuable nitrogen that is essential for good soil capable of growing life.

How to consciously dispose of your tree:

The easiest way to dispose of your tree properly is to take advantage of county christmasy tree recycling programs! Every country will be different, but most major cities have recycling programs in place that are compost and/or mulch focused.

Some counties provide curbside recycling programs, and other provide drop off locations. So even if your county won’t pick it up, chances are you’ll be able to find a drop off location near you!

Search this site for you county recycling options.

Regardless your recycling options, do not put your tree in a bag and ensure all of the ornaments, tensile, hooks, etc are removed. There may also be other requirements for your tree recycling program such as bundling your tree limbs, specific days etc- so again, check with your county requirements.

Alternatively, you can donate it to a conservation group in your area. Some conservation groups will take Christmas trees to use to prevent erosion around shorelines or to sink at the bottom lakes to use as artificial environments of fish! Sadly, there is no a resources for this (that I’m aware of), you’ll just have to do a little google research in your area.

If your county does not provide a recycling program, check with the Boy Scout chapter near you. They often have a recycling program and will come pick it up for a small fee of $5.

I really wish I could just give a blanket recommendation- “this is what to do!” But sadly, every county across the States is going to be different and it will require just a little google searching on your part! But I hope you are motivated to do so! If all 25+ million Christmas trees in the US were recycled and repurposed every year, this would have such a great impact.

xoxo,

meg


DIY: Homemade Beeswax Wraps

beeswax wraps

beeswax wraps

Beeswax wraps! Have you heard of them? Chances are you have… they’re taking the world by storm as sustainable initiatives take off and public awareness of our waste problem is becoming more widespread. 

More and more, people are more interested and open to more sustainable alternatives. This includes in the kitchen and around or food systems. 

These handy, reusable wraps can replace plastic wrap from just about anything! My favorite uses are : to wrap cheese, to seals bowls or jars, to wrap sandwiches and produce. 
There are a plethora of beeswax wraps that you can purchase online that vary in quality and cost. But you can also make them easily (and cheaply!) at home! 

The beeswax wraps that you can find online are often not just beeswax and cloth. If you make a wrap with only beeswax, it ends up being very stiff and does not adhere to itself or other surfaces well. (Trust me, I’ve tried.)

I’ve done quite a bit of experimenting with various combinations of ingredients and have landed one that I’m very happy with! It is malleable but not too sticky. 

I hope they work well for you!

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Ingredients: 

  • 100% cotton fabric (organic is best if you have it) 

  • 3 tbsp of beeswax- of course, purchasing from a local beekeeper is best! But if you can’t find one in your area, this is a great source: Mountain Rose Herb.

  • 1 tbsp beef tallow (I used Epic brand)

  • double boiler- or a make-shift one like I used (pictured below)

  • metal or wooden spoon 

Directions:

  1. Wash and dry fabric 

  2. Cut fabric into desired shapes and sizes. I cut mine into 8” x 8” squares. The mixture above is enough for one 8 x 8 square piece. Double or triple recipe if needed. 

  3. Grate beeswax. 

  4. Prepare double boiler - filling with water and bringing to a simmer.

  5. Measure lard and beeswax and place them together in the double boiler. 

  6. Allow them to melt together until there are no more clumps or lumps. 

  7. Once the mixture has melted down, remove from heat. Add the cloth to the pan, and using a spoon, work it around until it is completely covered in beeswax. (Be careful! It’s hot!) Remove cloth with tongs and spread out on parchment paper. Allow it to cool. 


    Maintenance: These will last you at least a few months! To clean, simply rinse gently with cool water and mild soap. 

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Alternative Gift Wrapping Ideas

Instead of buying wrapping paper, I’ve been collecting any paper bags that I get. I love it because it is versatile, minimalist, and best of all, more sustainably conscious!

Instead of buying wrapping paper, I’ve been collecting any paper bags that I get. I love it because it is versatile, minimalist, and best of all, more sustainably conscious!

The holidays are often a time of heavy consumption. But with our daily choices and decisions, we can cut down on the stress and the waste during the holiday season.

Wrapping paper is designed to be single use and contributes to an enormous amount of wasted resources.

Here are some staggering statistics from  www.use-less-stuff.com:

  • Americans throw away 25% more trash during the Thanksgiving to New Year's holiday period than any other time of year. The extra waste amounts to 25 million tons of garbage, or about 1 million extra tons per week!

  • If every family reused just two feet of holiday ribbon, the 38,000 miles of ribbon saved could tie a bow around the entire planet. 

  • If every American family wrapped just 3 presents in re-used materials, it would save enough paper to cover 45,000 football fields. 

  • The 2.65 billion Christmas cards sold each year in the U.S. could fill a football field 10 stories high. 

  • If we each sent one card less, we’d save 50,000 cubic yards of paper.

  • While the United States celebrates the holidays, Americans produce an additional 5 million tons of waste (four million of the 5 million tons consisting of wrapping paper and shopping bags).

Sadly, MILLIONS of pounds of wrapping paper go to landfills each year. Due to the lamination and dying, recycling is difficult. It is estimated that approximately 50,000 trees are cut down annually to accommodate our wrapping paper needs! 

Consider the following alternative wrapping ideas to make the season more environmentally friendly. Plus, it’s fun to get creative with it! 

Alternative Wrapping Ideas: 

  1. Repurpose brown bags: Instead of buying wrapping paper, I’ve been collecting any paper bags that I get. I love it because it is versatile and minimalist.

  2. Beeswax wraps

  3. Old sheets or fabric pieces- cut into a square and tie up with a ribbon or twine  

  4. Make or buy fabric gift bags that they can then reuse

  5. Reusable shopping bags

  6. Baskets 

  7. Newspaper 

  8. Old maps


Don’t forget to embellish your gifts! Here are some of my favorite:

  1. Dried orange slices

  2. Twine or ribbon 

  3. Red berries

  4. Wooden spoons

  5. Tree trimmings 

  6. Gingerbread men 

  7. Eucalyptus 

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More Sustainable Holiday Tips - from you all!

I asked you all on instagram what you do to make YOUR holiday more sustainable.

And y’all delivered!!! I got so many great and inspiring responses. Of course, I had to make a blog post out of them. I think we can ALL take away some inspiration from this list!

Enjoy! If you have any more tips, leave them in the comments section!

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  1. I’ve been getting thrifted scarves and such to wrap presents in instead of paper!

  2. Aquarium passes for people with kids.

  3. Buy tickets to an experience or membership, instead of an item.

  4. Supporting local artists!

  5. Using re-usable wrapping paper & home-making gifts!

  6. Buy good, sustainable, local coffee beans from roasters near you!

  7. Donate to a cause that each person in your family would love!

  8. Sponsoring family events instead of gifts. Laser tag and bowling together.

  9. Making little zero-waste starter kits as stocking stuffers! With a mason jar + bamboo utensils + reusable straw.

  10. Giving homemade/local edible gifts!

  11. Carry chop sticks, reusable wear on the go! Making my own doterra gifts.

  12. Use Sunday color comics as wrapping paper. This is really a tip for next year. Save the comics from each paper for a year.

  13. I’m asking my family to not use wrapping paper.

  14. We’re having a homemade Christmas and I always wrap with / reuse paper bags and newspapers.

  15. Fair trade gifts (coffee, leather goods, jewelry, etc.)

  16. My husband and I thrift at local shops regularly so we plan on a thrifted Christmas!

  17. I’m pretty serious about using fair trade super & chocolate for all that holiday baking!

  18. Using the app Good on You to find sustainable fashion and jewelry brands to gift people!

  19. Making everyone essential oil rollers. Making the ladies face oils and the men beard oils.

  20. I’m gifting reusable bags in the shape of fruit to all my my family members!

  21. Instead of gifts, everyone is getting holiday spirit and cheer from me!

What are you doing to make the holiday season more sustainable?!